Archive for the ‘2012_12’ Category

Agenda sets legislative priorities

Thursday, November 29th, 2012
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Texas Capitol building in Austin

The Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce will put a sevenpart, high-stakes agenda to work when the 83rd Texas Legislature is gaveled into session at noon on Jan. 8.

With Fort Worth’s economic future at stake, the agenda is “a thoroughly vetted collection of positions on a broad range of topics,” said David Parker, AT&T vice president for external affairs in Fort Worth and chairman of the Chamber’s 58-member Governmental Affairs Committee.

The agenda focuses on “all legislative issues that are important to the business community such as economic development, transportation, public and higher education, health care and water,” said Matt Geske, the Chamber’s director of governmental affairs.

The Chamber will draw on major strengths and resources to move the agenda forward, said Geske, whose blog during the legislative session will follow developments.

“First, we have a tremendous Tarrant County delegation in both the House and Senate,” he said. “They are pro-business, pro-commerce legislators who have historically supported the Chamber and our missions.

“Second, we work with seven other metro chambers on very similar issues.” The Metro 8, as the group is known, consists of chambers in Fort Worth, Dallas, Arlington, San Antonio, Houston, El Paso, Austin and Corpus Christi.

The Metro 8 greatly expands the Fort Worth Chamber’s reach, connecting with “many more legislators than just our own in Tarrant County,” Geske said.

Additionally, Parker said, the Chamber’s agenda will gain advantage with support and advocacy from Chamber members, highly influential local leaders in government and business and “lots of helpful ‘eyes and ears’ in Austin during the session.”

Those resources, they said, will be invaluable, particularly in overcoming opposition to authorization of two measures that are vital to economic development here and statewide – the Enterprise Fund and the Economic Development Act.  “These dollars help us compete with other states to get jobs here in DFW,” Parker said.

Another urgent matter involves funding for the state water plan, Geske said. “In light of severe recent droughts and “without a funded water plan, we face uncertainties.

“In order to attract and retain companies, we must have a secure, reliable water source. It is estimated that the state could lose up to $116 billion of income annually by 2060 if we fail to meet our growing water needs.”

The Chamber’s membership can play a vital role in meeting legislative challenges, Parker said.

He recommends that members “stay informed throughout the legislative session and prior to it, make sure the Chamber and the Governmental Affairs committee are aware of important issues to you and the community, stay ready and willing to send correspondence to our legislative delegation who are there to represent us.

“My personal advice is to: (a) always fully read and understand the language and intent of legislation; and (b) use one’s own unique expertise and creativity to provide proposed solutions for this community, not just complaints or proposals that benefit you.”

 

Texas Legislature Online:

http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/

Fort Worth Chamber’s public policy information:

http://www.fortworthchamber.com/public-policy/

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Q&A with Chamber’s Government Affairs director, committee chair

Thursday, November 29th, 2012
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David Parker & Matt Geske

The Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce’s Government Affairs department and related committees are gearing for the 83rd Texas Legislature that will convene in Austin on Jan. 8.

David Parker, AT&T vice president for external affairs in Fort Worth and chairman of the Chamber’s Governmental Affairs Committee, and Chamber Governmental Affairs Director Matt Geske discussed the Chamber’s legislative agenda and related matters in a Chamberletter Q&A.

 

1. The 83rdLegislature convenes on Jan. 8. What are some steps the Chamber is taking now through December to prepare for that session?

 

Parker: Consulting with our membership and local leadership for their input/issues/concerns/ideas; proactively reaching out to our local legislative delegation and those in Austin who are critical to our issues; and utilizing our various Chamber committees to help craft positions on their specific disciplines that our Governmental Affairs committee then pulls together for our Chamber Legislative Session Position Statements. These statements were approved by the Chamber Board of Directors on 10/18.

Geske:  On October 18th, the chamber’s Board of Directors unanimously approved our legislative agenda for the next session.  Our next step will be to reach out to our Tarrant County delegation, after the election, to discuss the issues critical to the business community in Fort Worth.  In addition, we are holding our Leaders in Government Legislative Preview with our legislators in December which will give our members a chance to meet our newest elected leaders as well as reconnect with our current legislators.

 

2. How do you describe the Chamber’s legislative agenda?

Parker: Broad and high-level on some topics and detailed/specific in some areas, but a thoroughly vetted collection of position statements on pro-commerce, pro-economic development, pro- Fort Worth community, and pro-education policies.

Geske: Our agenda focuses on all legislative issues that are important to the business community such as: economic development, transportation, public and higher education, health care and water.

 

3. How was the agenda formed?

Parker: The Chamber team develops the basic framework of issues, then provides to the various committees, receives positions and input from committees, then integrates that feedback into positions for the Governmental Affairs Committee agenda, who then debates/discusses/tweaks the issues, then approves the final version to go for a vote before the large board.

Geske: In the beginning of the process, we create a “skeleton” agenda based on relevant agenda items from previous sessions and allow our committees to add input that strengthens the overall statements.  The chamber vets the agenda through all of our committees (transportation, health care, environmental, governmental affairs).  After all input is taken from each of the committees, the governmental affairs committee makes any necessary revisions and then submits it for board approval.

 

4. What strengths and resources will the Chamber have in moving its agenda forward?

Parker: A strong, active pro-business legislative delegation here in North Texas; involvement and support of our members and influential local leaders; several current and potential Tarrant county chairs in the legislature; an engaged Governmental Affairs staff team; and a GA committee of experienced, knowledgeable members, along with lots of helpful “eyes and ears” in Austin during session.

Geske: First, we have a tremendous Tarrant County delegation in both the House and Senate. They are pro-business, pro-commerce legislators who support the Chamber and our missions.  Second, we work with 7 other metro chambers, “Metro 8,” on very similar issues.  Therefore, we are able to reach many more legislators than just our own in Tarrant County.

 

5. What’s an overriding concern, if there is one, that the agenda addresses?

Parker: Economic development dollars – we’ve got great ED leaders and guys like David Berzina who can flat lure business to this great area, but these dollars help us compete with other states to get those jobs here in DFW

Geske: The reauthorization of the Economic Development Act and the funding of the Enterprise Fund are two important economic development tools that could face opposition.  Both of these tools allow the state to attract and retain businesses, which in turn brings additional jobs and commerce.  Authorizing the Economic Development Act and the Enterprise Fund is one of the most important goals for the session. We are continually meeting with our Metro 8 colleagues (chambers in Fort Worth, Dallas, Arlington, San Antonio, Houston, El Paso, Austin and Corpus Christi) and meeting with staff and legislators on this issue.

 

6. The agenda addresses a diverse mix of leading issues, but what’s a particularly notable concern that’s addressed?

Geske: All of our issues are important to the business community, but funding the state water plan is a major issue facing the state.  The state went through one of the worst droughts in recent decades last summer and without a funded water plan, we face uncertainties as it pertains to water.  In order to attract and retain companies, we must have a secure, reliable water source. It is estimated that the state could lose up to $116 billion of income annually by 2060, if we fail to meet our growing water needs.

 

7. How can Chamber members help in moving the agenda forward?

Parker:  My recommendation is to stay informed throughout, and prior to, the Legislative Session, make sure the Chamber and the GA Committee are aware of important issues to you and the community, stay ready and willing to send correspondence to our legislative delegation who are there to represent US, and my personal advice is to: (a) always fully read and understand the language AND intent of legislation; and (b) use one’s own unique expertise and creativity to provide proposed solutions for this community, not just complaints or proposals that benefit only you.

Geske: We ask our members to become very familiar with the legislative agenda and be prepared to reach out to our legislative delegation when requested.  The outreach could include face-to-face meetings locally or in Austin with our legislators or crating letters or emails concerning legislation.  We also ask our membership to make us aware of legislation that could be damaging to their business.

 

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Award honors high-tech packaging company

Thursday, November 29th, 2012
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Harris Packaging Corp. of Haltom City, a winner of the Chamber’s 2012 Small Business of the Year Award, is headed by President and CEO Jana Harris-Bickford (right) and her sister, Controller Jenise Harris-Cox.

Thinking outside the box comes naturally at Harris Packaging Corporation (HPC).

It’s vital to the certified Woman Owned Business’s success as an innovative producer of a diverse mix of corrugated containers, displays and folding cartons for more than 200 customers here and across the United States.

Harris has consistently notched robust growth even during the recent economic downturn when, according to President and CEO Jana Harris-Bickford, “we chose to focus on how to grow rather than just on how to keep our heads above water.”

In 2009, Harris-Bickford and her sister, Controller Jenise Harris-Cox, became majority owners of the company that has long supported local charitable and civic causes and is a certified participant in the Sustainable Forest Initiative.

Founded by their parents, Joe and Joyce Harris, in 1976 in a small Haltom City sheet plant, HPC operates with state-of-the-art technology out of a more than 200,000-square-foot manufacturing and office facility.

With a workforce of around 100 highly experienced employees, HPC is one of the largest sheet plants in Texas and one of only a few to have a folding carton operation – American Carton Company, which Joe Harris launched in Mansfield in 1992.

The Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce honored Harris Packaging this year with the 2012 Small Business of the Year Award in the 51-150 Employees category. “Everyone was thrilled,” Harris-Cox said. “We all feel proud of the quality work that we produce, the company and its history, and the employees themselves.”

Harris Packaging, recently has taken strategic steps to compete in an industry that faces increasing challenges in the United States.

“As more and more of the U.S. manufacturers moved overseas, we began to take a look at what was left, what industries are still manufacturing here in the States,” Harris-Bickford said.

“We also began to look at investing in equipment that many of our competitors do not have. This allowed us to narrow the playing field in certain markets” such as precision packaging for food and pharmaceutical companies.”

HPC employees operate sophisticated high-speed equipment and quality controls to produce everything from plain brown boxes to four-color products printed and die-cut with exact precision. Some jobs rely on custom inks made in-house.

“Almost every product that is manufactured is at some point in a box, whether it is for shipping purposes only or if it is catching the consumer’s eye sitting on a retail shelf. Packaging is … in many cases the also the billboard or marketing tool for the product.”

      

Harris Packaging Corporation website:  www.harrispackaging.com

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Q&A with Harris Packaging’s C-level sisters

Thursday, November 29th, 2012
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Harris Packaging Corp. of Haltom City, a winner of the Chamber’s 2012 Small Business of the Year Award, is headed by President and CEO Jana Harris-Bickford (right) and her sister, Controller Jenise Harris-Cox.

Harris Packaging Corporation of  Haltom City, winner of the Chamber’s 2012 Small Business of the Year Award in the 51-150 Employees category, is a highly successful and competitive operation. President and CEO Jana Harris-Bickford and her sister, Controller Jenise Harris-Cox, shared thoughts about the enterprise for a Chamberletter Q&A.

 

How important is packaging to products’ success?

Packaging is vital to a product’s success.  It is not only the protective container that is used for transportation of the product, but in many cases the package is also the billboard or marketing tool for the product.

You produce world-class work with great precision. How do you describe the level of sophistication in the skills and equipment necessary to drive HPC and (subsidiary) American Carton Company of Mansfield?

Having equipment with the newest technology is key to being able to compete in today’s market. But just as critical if not more so, is having skilled employees. The employees are truly what have helped us to continue to manufacture a quality product year after year.

As you noted in the SBOY application, HPC has thrived during tough economic times. What’s in HPC’s heart of hearts that has made that possible?

Determination and willingness to take chances. During the tough economic times we began to think of ideas and markets that we normally would not have gone after. We had recently purchased a new piece of equipment for value added graphics purposes, but we realized it could also run a plain box without graphics very fast and more efficiently than we had been able to do before. This was not the original plan or product mix for this equipment, but it did allow us to be competitive in markets we were not competitive in the past. We were able to adjust to the challenges and look for other ways to get new business. We chose to focus on how to grow rather than just on how to keep our heads above water.

 

Your application also noted the challenge of increased competition from foreign competitors. How has HPC responded to that challenge?

Almost every product that is manufactured is at some point in a box, whether it is for shipping purposes only or if it is catching the consumer’s eye sitting on a retail shelf. As more and more of the U.S. manufacturers are moved overseas, we began to take a look at what was left, what industries are still manufacturing here in the States. We also began to look at investing in equipment that many of our competitors do not have. This allowed us to narrow the playing field in certain markets.

What’s one of the most important lessons you have learned from your dad?

That you cannot be successful alone. It takes a team of employees, with different talents and strengths to get the job done and to be a success.

What was HPC’s reaction to winning the SBOY award?

Everyone was thrilled! We all feel proud of the quality work that we produce, the company and its history, and the employees themselves. We think that we are an outstanding company, but to be recognized by our peers at the chamber….that was quite an honor.  Our father, Joe Harris, was especially proud that the company he started and worked so hard for over the last 36 years was being recognized as a Small Business of the Year by other business people in our community.

Would you encourage other businesses to enter the competition?

I would absolutely encourage others to enter the competition. It makes you step back and evaluate your recent strengths and successes and it brings a sense of unity among the employees. It has also provided positive publicity and recognition, which is always advantageous.

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Chamber recognizes individuals with inaugural High Impact Awards

Thursday, November 29th, 2012
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The Fort Worth Chamber has launched an annual High Impact Award to recognize individual Chamber members who

have shown remarkable dependability, dedication and commitment to the Chamber and its mission, to their fellow Chamber members and to the Fort Worth business community.

Three individuals were presented with High Impact Awards October 30 at the first annual High Impact Breakfast: Amber Tinsley, Donnie Boivin and former Mayor Bob Bolen. (See a video tribute to Mayor Bolen here.)

Amber Tinsley

Amber Tinsley, vice president of marketing for American Jewelry & Estate Experts, and Donnie Boivin, sales director at Sandler Training — SalesMastery Consultants, received recognition for their commitment coordinating two Chamber Leads Groups. Tinsley coordinates the Wild West Leads Group and Boivin the Fort Worth Business Exchange.

Leads Groups are comprised of no more than 30 members with each one representing a different industry. They meet weekly and last year, generated more than $3 million in sales among them.

“Amber and Donnie have taken chamber volunteer commitment to a new level,” said Bill Thornton, president and CEO of the Fort Worth Chamber. “They arrange for speakers, take calls from members, and have begun organizing quarterly events to bring all the leads group members together for a fun event that has a positive impact on the community.”

Donnie Boivin

The last event helped collect school supplies, the November event will support a program that assists homeless youth, and in December, they’ll be working at Meadowbrook & Rosemont Middle schools to outfit their two new Go Centers, which are spaces where students research college options.

Legacy Award Recipient

Former Mayor Bob Bolen was honored with the High Impact Legacy Award for a lifetime of entrepreneurship and public service to the citizens of Fort Worth. Among Bolen’s many accomplishments, he was recognized for his leadership in helping to establish the first Public Improvement District (PID) downtown, attracting the U.S. Treasury’s Bureau of Engraving and Printing, and championing the public-private partnership that is now AllianceTexas, a master-planned community with commercial and residential developments as well as an industrial airport.

Bob Bolen

“This city would look very different today were it not for Bob Bolen,” said Thornton. “He has been passionate about Fort Worth, and certainly delivered on his motto of leaving a place better than he found it. He’s a role model for the business people, elected officials and citizens of Texas.”

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Greater Tarrant Business Ethics Award and Vandergriff Award Presented at State of the County Luncheon

Thursday, November 29th, 2012
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Two awards were presented at the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce’s second annual State of the County luncheon November 7, 2012 at the Renaissance Worthington Fort Worth Hotel. The 2012 Greater Tarrant Business Ethics Awards (GTBEA) were announced, as well as the Vandergriff Award.

 

Business Ethics Award

The recipient of the 2012 GTBEA was Bennett Benner Pettit, a multidisciplinary design firm, offering architecture, urban design and planning, economic development, interior design, and landscape architecture. Firm Principals include Michael J. Bennett, AIA; J. Bruce Benner, AIA; and David Pettit.

Calloway’s Nursery was also a finalist in the competition. Calloway’s Nursery, Inc. is an independent Texas-based garden center founded by local nurserymen, Jim Estill, John Cosby and John Peters. Calloway’s operates 16 stores in the Dallas/Fort Worth market and two stores in the Houston market.

“Both these finalists are exceptional companies,” said Shannon Shipp, Ph.D., GTBEA Judging Committee Chair and Associate Professor of Marketing and Director of the Neeley Ethics Initiative in the M.J. Neeley School of Business, Texas Christian University.

“BBP received the award because of their documented evidence of the integrity of their corporate code of ethics, as well as a clear demonstration of the company’s commitment to ethical business practices through management and employee behavior.”

Awarded by the Society of Financial Service Professionals, the Neeley School of Business at TCU and the Financial Planning Association, the Greater Tarrant Business Ethics Award honors companies that demonstrate a firm commitment to ethical business practices in their everyday operations, management philosophies and in response to crises or challenges.

Vandergriff Award

The Vandergriff Award honored Van Cliburn for bringing worldwide acclaim to Fort Worth through the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition and the Van Cliburn Foundation, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year.

“Van is deeply touched by the love and support he’s been shown throughout the years, and truly considers Fort Worth his home,” said Alann Bedford Sampson, interim president of the Van Cliburn Foundation, who accepted the award on Cliburn’s behalf. “Great classical music is revered here and because of you, it will always live on here,” she told the audience of 450, who responded with a standing ovation.

The Vandergriff Award was established in 2011 in memory of the late Tarrant County Judge Tom Vandergriff and recognizes an individual, company, organization or event that has positively impacted Tarrant County. General Motors received the award in 2011.

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Economic Updates

Thursday, November 29th, 2012
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In the Works

ATC Electronics & Logistics Inc is likely to win tax breaks in Fort Worth after the city council voted unanimously to designate 2 north Fort Worth parcels as tax abatement reinvestment zones in which property is eligible for a tax abatement. The company already has three separately leased locations in Fort Worth.
Fort Worth Business Press, October 2, 2012

Victory Healthcare, a Woodlands-based, for-profit hospital, announced plans to build a $70 million specialized surgical hospital in Fort Worth.
Dallas Business Journal, October 5, 2012

Amazon.com is considering 2 Dallas-Fort Worth sites for distribution centers. In addition to asking the City of Coppell for tax breaks for a possible distribution center in the city, the company is also looking at a site near Alliance Airport in Fort Worth.
Dallas Business Journal, October 8, 2012

 The Texas Department of Transportation reached a tentative $1.6 billion deal with a private developer to expand Interstate 35W in north Fort Worth, which is the most congested stretch of highway in the state. The project is expected to begin in 2013 and be completed by 2018.
Star-Telegram, October 11, 2012

A 105-bed assisted-living center for the elderly and those with dementia and Alzheimer’s is planned for Fort Worth near Bryant Irvin and Interstate 20 by SRP Medical and Frontier Management. The 100,000 square foot senior living community is expected to open in 2014.
Star-Telegram, October 12, 2012

Baylor Health Care System and United Surgical Partners International Inc are constructing a 77,000 square foot, two-story surgical center in Fort Worth. The center will be located on the north side of Park Place Avenue.
Fort Worth Business Press, October 15, 2012

Flexpipe Systems, a Calgary-based pipeline systems producer, asked Fort Worth for a maximum $2.2 million, 12-year property tax abatement, with plans to open a plant in southeast Fort Worth that would employ as many as 350 people. Fort Worth City Council is scheduled to vote on the abatement plan on November 6th.
Star-Telegram, October 17, 2012

 

Expansions and Moves

Cash America International, a Fort Worth-based company, says it has agreed to buy 34 pawnshops in Tennessee, North Carolina, Kentucky, and Arizona. The final acquisition price is between $68 and $82 million, which will be paid in cash and funded by long-term lines of credit.
Star-Telegram, October 10, 2012

On the Dotted Line

Southside Christian Center sold its facilities to Bethany Church of Fort Worth. Southside Christian also sold its property at 6901 Wichita Avenue to the city of Forest Hill.
Star-Telegram, October 1, 2012

Utopia Graphix leased 12,000 square feet of warehouse space at 814 Blue Mound Road in Fort Worth from Steele Folsom Martin.
Star-Telegram, October 8, 2012

MJ Thomas Engineering, a civil engineering firm, leased 2,700 square feet of office space for a headquarters at 3973 West Vickery Boulevard in Fort Worth.
Star-Telegram, October 8, 2012

Anpeca Corp, a women’s apparel manufacturer, bought a 12,600 square foot building on Montgomery Street in Fort
Worth. The building was previously used by Toby’s Speakers and Blocker Industries.
Star-Telegram, October 8, 2012

Motion Industries, which does business as Hub Supply, leased 9,000 square at 2517 Gravel Drive in Fort Worth and 3,600 feet at 7545 Pebble Drive in Fort Worth.
Star-Telegram, October 8, 2012

LMS Properties purchased 67,700 square feet of industrial warehouse space at 9001 South Freeway in Fort Worth.
Fort Worth Business Press, October 8, 2012

 Total Wine & More leased 27,350 square feet in the Hulen Fashion Center in Fort Worth. For $317 a year, wine drinkers can keep 12 cases of wine in temperature-controlled conditions.
Star-Telegram, October 15, 2012
/ Star-Telegram, October 25, 2012

Texas Midstream Gas Services leased 20,648 square feet in the D.R. Horton Tower in Forth Worth.
Star-Telegram, October 15, 2012

Edgepark Medical leased 70,000 square feet of industrial space.
Star-Telegram, October 15, 2012

The owner of Nissan of Fort Worth completed a sale and lease-back of the dealership property as part of a $66 million portfolio sale to an entity of the New York-based investment firm WP Carey & Co.
Star-Telegram, October 18, 2012

ATC Physician Services leased 1,800 square feet of office space at 4770 Bryant Irvin Court in Fort Worth.
Star-Telegram, October 22, 2012

Title Boxing Club leased 5,404 square feet in the Hulen Fashion Center in Fort Worth.
Star-Telegram, October 22, 2012

Dr. Michael Boothby bought 69,020 square feet of land at Edwards Ranch Clearfork in Fort Worth.
Star-Telegram, October 29, 2012

EO Wood Co leased 36,230 square feet of industrial space at 1832 Mony Street in Fort Worth.
Star-Telegram, October 29, 2012

Arnetic Events LLC leased 13,088 square feet of office space at 3000 Race Street in Fort Worth.
Star-Telegram, October 29, 2012

Hunter Chase Capital Partners bought 74,270 square feet of land at Loop 820 and Team Ranch Road in Fort Worth.
Star-Telegram, October 29, 2012

 

Openings

3 Parrots Taco Shop opened its third location at the Beach Western Commons shopping center in Fort Worth. The Baja taco shop leased a space at 6650 North Beach Street. The other restaurant locations are in Benbrook and Granbury.
Star-Telegram, October 1, 2012

Houlihan’s, a Kansas-based dining chain, opened its first Fort Worth location this month at 9365 Rain Lilly Trail in Alliance Town Center. The restaurant will feature a new menu with items not found at other locations.
Fort Worth Business Press, October 19, 2012

Torchy’s Tacos, an Austin-based taco diner, will open in December at the corner of West Rosedale Street and Forest Park in Fort Worth.
Fort Worth Business Press, October 19, 2012

Frank Kent Cadillac opened a new dealership at 3500 West Loop 820. The dealership is 86,000 square feet and features a café, a children’s play area, a dog park, and a boutique wine shop. The dealership is expected to bring 20 jobs to Fort Worth.
Fort Worth Business Press, October 19, 2012

Tim Love, chef of the Woodshed and Lonesome Dove, says he is opening his Love Shack burger restaurant at Blue Bonnet Circle in Fort Worth. Love Shack is expected to open on November 2nd.
Star-Telegram, October 25, 2012

 

Around Town

LaGrave Field, which is home to the minor-league Fort Worth Cats baseball team, was bought by an affiliate of the team’s ownership group for $4.5 million. The transaction guarantees that the team has a place to play.
Star-Telegram, October 3, 2012

The Texas Brahmas, the local hockey team, has been sold to a local investment group that is run by Fort Worth businessman Mike Atkinson. The team also announced that it is changing its name to the Fort Worth Brahmas.
Fort Worth Business Press, October 12, 2012

Catholic Charities took over transportation services for the needy in Fort Worth. The responsibility was previously held by American Red Cross.
Star-Telegram, October 12, 2012

Colonial Savings, a Fort Worth-based regional bank, announced that it is going to be the official sponsor of the Bell Helicopter Armed Forces Bowl game, which will be held at Amon G. Carter Stadium in Fort Worth. The terms of the deal were undisclosed.
Dallas Business Journal, October 18, 2012

 

Out of Town Reporting

UMED Holdings Inc, a Fort Worth-based holding company, acquired a 50 percent interest in Rig Support Services Inc in a stock for stock transaction.
Market News Publishing, October 15, 2012

Fort Worth was one of 5 Texas cities honored with a 2012 Community Economic Development Award from the Texas Economic Development Council. Fort Worth attracted GE Manufacturing Solutions, which purchased a 670,000 square facility in north Fort Worth. The $100 million capital investment is expected to bring more than 500 jobs with annual salaries averaging over $40,000.
US State News, October 23, 2012

Fort Worth Employees Retirement Fund approved a $15 million allocation to BTG Pactual, a Brazilian-based hedge fund. Fort Worth Employees Retirement Fund has $1.8 billion in assets.
Infovest21 News, October 26, 2012

 

Did You Know?

Cutting Edge Haunted House on 1701 East Lancaster Avenue in Fort Worth ranked 5th on a national list of 31 haunted houses. The list was compiled by HauntedHouseRatings.com. The rankings were determined by customer electronic voting.
Fort Worth Business Press, October 1, 2012

Loan Portfolio Servicing (LPS), a Fort Worth-based company, announced that it is now active as a national third-party servicer of subprime automotive loans. LPS currently manages $50 million in auto portfolios.
Fort Worth Business Press, October 11, 2012

A new manufacturing jobs training program aimed at putting military veterans to work is coming to Fort Worth. As part of the program, some of the nation’s leading manufacturing companies will work with local community and technology colleges to offer training to help veterans become certified in areas such as electronics, welding, and machining. The training center should open sometime in 2013.
Star-Telegram, October 16, 2012

The YMCA of Metropolitan Fort Worth and the city of Fort Worth agreed to renovate some vacant sports fields at 4230 Alta Mesa Boulevard, near Southwest High School. The new $2 million sports complex is scheduled to open its first phase in May 2013.
Fort Worth Business Press, October 22, 2012

For more economic updates, visit our Economic Development website. 

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